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Taschen Mackintosh

Taschen

€15.00 EUR

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The life and work of Glasgow School pioneer Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

The work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh combined Scottish tradition, modern function, and Japanese elegance into a unique oeuvre across architecture and design. A key proponent of the turn-of-the-century Glasgow Style, Mackintosh also influenced Art Nouveau across Europe with his bold yet lyrical repertoire of vivid lines, elegant proportions, and natural motifs.

The architect, designer, and painter while he was one of the earliest pioneers of modern architecture and design, he did not receive much recognition in his hometown of Glasgow during his lifetime, but his bold new blend of simplicity and poetic detail inspired modernists across Europe.

His approach incorporated architecture, furniture, landscapes, graphic design, and flower studies. He embraced strong lines, elegant proportions, and natural motifs, combining an adventurous dose of japonisme with a modernist sensibility for function. He preferred bold black typography, restrained shapes, and tall, generous windows suffusing rooms with light.

Much of his work was collaborative practice with his wife, Margaret Macdonald. The couple made up half of the loose Glasgow collective known as “The Four”; the other two were Margaret’s sister, Frances, and her husband, Herbert MacNair. On the continent, the “Glasgow Style” was met with delight. In Italy, Germany, and, in particular, Austria, artists of the Viennese Secession and Art Nouveau drew much from its rectilinear yet lyrical forms.

This book includes his complete scheme for the Willow Tea Rooms and the Mackintosh Building at the Glasgow School of Art, widely considered Mackintosh’s masterwork.

  • Hardcover, 21 x 26 cm, 96 pages.
  • ISBN: 9783836561600.
  • Edition: English.
  • Product dispatches within 1 business day.
  • 1-5 days delivery time.
  • 15 days return. Product must be sealed, unopened and in its original package.
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